clark-ed:

erickimberlinbowley:

The Loneliest Whale in the World.
In 2004, The New York Times wrote an article about the loneliest whale in the world. Scientists have been tracking her since 1992 and they discovered the problem:
She isn’t like any other baleen whale. Unlike all other whales, she doesn’t have friends. She doesn’t have a family. She doesn’t belong to any tribe, pack or gang. She doesn’t have a lover. She never had one. Her songs come in groups of two to six calls, lasting for five to six seconds each. But her voice is unlike any other baleen whale. It is unique—while the rest of her kind communicate between 12 and 25hz, she sings at 52hz. You see, that’s precisely the problem. No other whales can hear her. Every one of her desperate calls to communicate remains unanswered. Each cry ignored. And, with every lonely song, she becomes sadder and more frustrated, her notes going deeper in despair as the years go by.
Just imagine that massive mammal, floating alone and singing—too big to connect with any of the beings it passes, feeling paradoxically small in the vast stretches of empty, open ocean.

Someone pay my expenses I’ll be more than glad to be friends with her

Well, my heart just sank

clark-ed:

erickimberlinbowley:

The Loneliest Whale in the World.

In 2004, The New York Times wrote an article about the loneliest whale in the world. Scientists have been tracking her since 1992 and they discovered the problem:

She isn’t like any other baleen whale. Unlike all other whales, she doesn’t have friends. She doesn’t have a family. She doesn’t belong to any tribe, pack or gang. She doesn’t have a lover. She never had one. Her songs come in groups of two to six calls, lasting for five to six seconds each. But her voice is unlike any other baleen whale. It is unique—while the rest of her kind communicate between 12 and 25hz, she sings at 52hz. You see, that’s precisely the problem. No other whales can hear her. Every one of her desperate calls to communicate remains unanswered. Each cry ignored. And, with every lonely song, she becomes sadder and more frustrated, her notes going deeper in despair as the years go by.

Just imagine that massive mammal, floating alone and singing—too big to connect with any of the beings it passes, feeling paradoxically small in the vast stretches of empty, open ocean.

Someone pay my expenses I’ll be more than glad to be friends with her

Well, my heart just sank

(Source: erickimberlinbowley, via niconordstrom)

“The best feeling in the world is knowing your presence and absence both mean something to someone.”
— Unknown (via sadfag)

(Source: thedailypozitive, via di-sotto-in-su)

“Have you ever met someone and instantly known your life was richer for it?”
“If it’s meant for you, you won’t have to beg for it. You will never have to sacrifice your dignity for your destiny.”
— Chelsis Porter  (via mermaidsongs)

(Source: simply-quotes, via debonairfucker-deactivated20140)

taktophoto:

Typography by Antonio Rodrigues Jr

“Anybody can learn to think, or believe, or know, but not a single human being can be taught to feel… the moment you feel, you’re nobody-but-yourself - in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else - means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight, and never stop fighting.”
— E.E. Cummings (via indicio)

(via di-sotto-in-su)

“Close some doors today. Not because of pride, incapacity or arrogance, but simply because they lead you nowhere.”
— Paulo Coelho (via themoonflowers)

(Source: larmoyante, via gilandy-deactivated20140608)

“The best kiss is the one that has been exchanged a thousand times between the eyes before it reaches the lips.”
“If I love you more, will you suffer less?”
— Elie Wiesel, quoting his five-year-old grandson at Boston University lecture series (via themoonflowers)

(Source: melaniekirsh, via gilandy-deactivated20140608)